Spotlight Interview: Adam Morley, Co-owner of Welcome Fellow

Spotlight Interview: Adam Morley, Co-owner of Welcome Fellow

Have you passed the full glass panes looking in on exposed brick on Tejon, just south of Colorado College and just north of the business district? The simple profile outline of a man's head on the door doesn't give away anything, but since its inception in 2016, Welcome Fellow has been building a name for itself in Colorado Springs. Today we chat with Adam Morley, one of the co-owners of Welcome Fellow to learn more!

MyCo: What is Welcome Fellow?

AM: Welcome Fellow is a co-working and event space meant to support and grow the Colorado Springs freelance community. We’re here because we want to push our city to a higher level. We provide work and meeting space to small business owners in a variety of different fields, from writing and photography, to web/app dev and design. Our co-working space is for members only, but our special events are for everyone. We host workshops and other events that are meant to help freelancers/startups get a leg up on the competition. We do fun stuff too, like concerts and happy hours that are just meant to get our community together for a good time. We talk about it all events on our social media!

 Photos from @welcomefellow

Photos from @welcomefellow

MyCo: Who are your ideal clients?

AM: Anyone looking for a community of support from other freelancers and hustlers. Creative types tend you enjoy our space the most, but we work with people in all professions. As long as they live by our slogan: #GetShitDone

MyCo: Is this your first business?

AM: WF is my second business. I also started an internet marketing firm in 2015, and we specialize in anything internet related from Google AdWords, to social media, SEO, digital products, and design.

 Photos from @welcomefellow

Photos from @welcomefellow

MyCo: What is the biggest reason for your success so far?

AM: There’s a saying that goes, “A rising tide lifts all boats”. That means that if we want to see success, at least my definition of success, then we better start investing in each other, helping each other, and caring about everyone’s success. Not just worrying about what sort of personal gain we get from every interaction. A huge part of the successes I’ve seen so far has come from caring about my own corner of the world. Being involved in this city, caring about the people in it, and looking for ways to raise the tide with our resources are the avenues to success. That’s the mindset that gave birth to concepts like Café Motique and Welcome Fellow. It’s a constant learning experience. Welcome Fellow is one of my favorite places because it’s a natural extension of my priorities. You’ll become like the people you surround yourself with, so be around the kind of people you want to be like. That’s as important as making money. If I can support my clients, employees, friends, or strangers I run across, then the foundation I want for success is being built. Any business can make plenty of money, but many of them never make enough impact in their community. Going to work every day and going home every night isn’t gonna cut it. If we want our city and our own communities to be great, we have to be more, invest more, and start thinking about success differently.

MyCo: What is your favorite thing about co-working?

AM: Co-working naturally creates collaboration and support. Being around people, supporting them, nudging them toward doing hard things, and being available as a helping hand is important to me, and all those things can happen more naturally and definitely more often in a co-working environment. I love seeing growth happen. In that environment, I get to see it happen at all stages, from a beginning idea to a profitable venture. But I’m very much a people person, so the social aspect is always going to be huge for me.

 Photos from @welcomefellow

Photos from @welcomefellow

MyCo: If it was possible, what advice would you give yourself 10 years ago?

AM: These are all things I still have to tell myself to do just about every day. 1. Hustle until you feel like you work as hard as the person you look up to most. Some days, you’ll have to work until midnight and skip the night out with friends, but you won’t regret it. Set goals and just knock them out one at a time.  2. Do it for the right reasons. Be honest about what you want, and head in that direction. This doesn’t mean only do work you want to do, because at the beginning, you’ll have to pay your bills somehow. But don’t forget what your goals are, and gear everything you do to point you toward those. 3. Make progress of some kind each day. We all waste a crazy amount of time. It doesn’t have to be a lot, but make a move and take the next step. Whether it’s for your personal wellbeing or your business, always think about spending more of your time on growth in some capacity. That’s still my advice to myself, but it’s never easy!

MyCo: What is the best small business in your neighborhood?

AM: My neighbor Mark has one hell of a junkyard happening in his backyard. You can’t call it a business as much as a…post-tornado metal graveyard, but if he did more than watch YouTube, he could make some serious cash and probably be the most popular business in my neighborhood. By the way, you can follow all his shenanigans at @crazymarkk on Insta. So besides him, I gotta give it to the Wild Goose, Loyal Coffee, or Brooklyn’s On Boulder. They’re all beautifully designed spaces that help raise the standard in our city, in terms of service and overall quality. They're full of great people, and they’re being intentional about making moves in our community.

 Photos from @welcomefellow

Photos from @welcomefellow

MyCo: What is the best event you recently attended?

AM: Car Window Poetry held an event called True Stories last month (and they’re doing another one this month) where a few people got up and told their life stories. It was the most inspiring event I’ve been to in a long time. The stories were all difficult to hear, in that each person came from abuse, broken families, and other really extreme life scenarios. But each of them brought their stories back to the concept of hope, and shared how they broke out of the downward spiral, improved their own lives and the ones around them as best they could, and focused on making the world a better place rather than staying at rock bottom. Events like that are important because we can empower each other if we tell our stories more often.

If you are interested in a membership at Welcome Fellow or in attending any of their community-building events, find more at www.welcomefellow.com or on Instagram @welcomefellow.

 Photos from @welcomefellow

Photos from @welcomefellow

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